Britannica out of print?

Redefining Research
After 244 years, the Encyclopedia Britannica has decided to halt the presses and go out of print. Facing the realities and the stiff competition from Wikipedia, the Encyclopedia Britannica will now focus primarily on their online services. But even then, it might be too late. Wikipedia has grown to be the number one source for students. In fact, many students will stop research and change topics if it’s not on Wikipedia Open-Site.org.

Wikipedia’s popularity and the below infographic presents an enlightening comparison of Wikipedia to libraries. However, the statistics of this infographic in relation to errors per article are very close to that of Britannica’s in their encyclopedia. Anyone can edit articles on Wikipedia so it is not to our benefit as accurate information professionals not to carefully scrutinize the genuine credibility of the information provided.

Wikipedia
Via: Open-Site.org

A “School Library Post” by Joyce Kasman Valenza discusses the emerging importance of inforgraphic. Infographics are hard to avoid. As media messages, they have taken hold in the marketing and business worlds. Infographics also present new opportunities for construction of knowledge. I’ve been fascinated by the potential for infographics as an assessment of student learning and understanding
The following is an direct reference from VOYA (librarian Journal) article

‘Infographics as an Infolit Product’ by Joyce Kasman Valenza.

“Because they are so viral, infographics present fertile tools for media literacy instruction and deconstruction. Our students will be expected to make sense of these visual texts in their lives outside of school. They will need to know how statistics are used and how they are massaged. Though they may look authoritative, some of the infographics we encounter are created by people who are not necessarily experts in data and its analysis. Source links, generally listed on the bottom of most infographics, vary in quality.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s